Fotografia turned 1 today!

Fotografia turned 1 today!

(Source: assets)

vintageblackglamour:

Bill Cosby to Ebony magazine in 1966: “Someday, I want to do a family situation comedy on television and it will be a hit because people want to see what goes on in a Negro home today.”In this photo, Dr. Cosby is being congratulated by his wife Camille on his first Emmy win for “I Spy” on May 22, 1966. Photo by Jack Smith/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images.

vintageblackglamour:

Bill Cosby to Ebony magazine in 1966: “Someday, I want to do a family situation comedy on television and it will be a hit because people want to see what goes on in a Negro home today.”

In this photo, Dr. Cosby is being congratulated by his wife Camille on his first Emmy win for “I Spy” on May 22, 1966. Photo by Jack Smith/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images.

Bring back the curls Lark Voorhies!!!

Bring back the curls Lark Voorhies!!!

noddinghonesty:

Angela Basset
shaninrealism:

Matthew Rushing and Linda Celeste Sims. Photo by Andrew Eccles

Alvin Ailey Dance Theater

shaninrealism:


Matthew Rushing and Linda Celeste Sims. Photo by Andrew Eccles
Alvin Ailey Dance Theater
vintageblackglamour:

Olympic icon Florence Griffith Joyner, photographed by Irving Penn for Vogue in 1989. Ms. Griffith Joyner won 5 Olympic medals in her career (4 gold, 1 silver) and shattered two world records. The Los Angeles-born athletic superstar was also a superstar of style - designing her own trademark one-legged track suits and wearing brilliantly designed eye-catching nails that matched her outfits and quite often, the stars and stripes of the U.S. flag. “Flo Jo” died in 1998 at the age of 38 due to complications from epilepsy.

vintageblackglamour:

Olympic icon Florence Griffith Joyner, photographed by Irving Penn for Vogue in 1989. Ms. Griffith Joyner won 5 Olympic medals in her career (4 gold, 1 silver) and shattered two world records. The Los Angeles-born athletic superstar was also a superstar of style - designing her own trademark one-legged track suits and wearing brilliantly designed eye-catching nails that matched her outfits and quite often, the stars and stripes of the U.S. flag. “Flo Jo” died in 1998 at the age of 38 due to complications from epilepsy.

vintageblackglamour:

Olympic icon Jesse Owens and his wife, Ruth Owens, return home from the Olympics in Berlin on August 24, 1936. The son of a sharecropper and grandson of slaves, the Oakville, Alabama-born Mr. Owens won a record 4 gold medals at the 1936 games, annihilating the racist myth of white superiority in the presence of Adolph Hitler. Mr. Owens stated after his victories, “When I came back to my native country, after all the stories about Hitler, I couldn’t ride in the front of the bus. I had to go to the back door. I couldn’t live where I wanted. I wasn’t invited to shake hands with Hitler, but I wasn’t invited to the White House to shake hands with the President, either.” Mr. and Mrs. Owens had three daughters and were married for 45 years before he died in 1980 at the age of 66 of lung cancer. Photo: by Joseph Costa/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images.

vintageblackglamour:

Olympic icon Jesse Owens and his wife, Ruth Owens, return home from the Olympics in Berlin on August 24, 1936. The son of a sharecropper and grandson of slaves, the Oakville, Alabama-born Mr. Owens won a record 4 gold medals at the 1936 games, annihilating the racist myth of white superiority in the presence of Adolph Hitler. Mr. Owens stated after his victories, “When I came back to my native country, after all the stories about Hitler, I couldn’t ride in the front of the bus. I had to go to the back door. I couldn’t live where I wanted. I wasn’t invited to shake hands with Hitler, but I wasn’t invited to the White House to shake hands with the President, either.” Mr. and Mrs. Owens had three daughters and were married for 45 years before he died in 1980 at the age of 66 of lung cancer. Photo: by Joseph Costa/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images.

vintageblackglamour:

Alice Coachman (far right), the first African-American woman to win a gold medal (1948 London) takes a break and watches the games with fellow athletes, Emma Reed, of Nashville, Tennessee (broad and high jumper) and Nell C. Jackson, of Tuskegee, Alabama, (200 meters and relay. Ms. Coachman, a native of Albany, Georgia, won the gold in the high jump. Photo: Bettman/Corbis

vintageblackglamour:

Alice Coachman (far right), the first African-American woman to win a gold medal (1948 London) takes a break and watches the games with fellow athletes, Emma Reed, of Nashville, Tennessee (broad and high jumper) and Nell C. Jackson, of Tuskegee, Alabama, (200 meters and relay. Ms. Coachman, a native of Albany, Georgia, won the gold in the high jump. Photo: Bettman/Corbis

(Source: , via fittnfabulouss)

vintageblackglamour:

This 1940s MGM publicity photo of Lena Horne is one of my absolute favorites and absolutely in the book.

vintageblackglamour:

This 1940s MGM publicity photo of Lena Horne is one of my absolute favorites and absolutely in the book.